Lucy, or What Are You Trying to Say, Besson?

Hello everyone. In my inaugural post on The Movie Club, I am going to review Lucy, which I saw this afternoon.

So, from the trailers, I knew the movie was going to use the utterly fictional "we only use 10% of our brain" concept. Ok, I can live with that - fiction is allowed to use unrealistic ideas to tell a story. Limitless used the same concept, and it did it well. But Lucy doesn't.

The problem is that this movie has real serious shit to say about the meaning of life, the universe and all that, yo! There is so much symbolism in this movie, most of it really obvious. At the beginning, Lucy's boyfriend begs her to take a suitcase inside a hotel. He assures her that this is just paperwork and nothing bad is going to happen to her. We then cut to a mouse looking at a bit of cheese in a mousetrap. No shit, Sherlock! Is Besson a Mon Calamari or something?

So yeah, this movie is trying to say something about the meaning of life - unfortunately, the entire thing is based around a concept that is scientifically proven to be bullshit. And even if it wasn't bullshit, the movie never uses it in a believable way. While in Litmitless, using more than 10% of his brain simply allowed Bradley Cooper to remember more stuff and to make more connections faster, Lucy using more than ten percent of her brain allows her to control and read mind, control machinery, hack into anything, change her body at will, alter gravity, etc. At the end, the narrator literally states that this story should tell us what to do with our life. I still have no idea what that was about.

But that could be ignored, if the action movie was good. But it isn't. Sure, Besson knows how to direct an action scene, and the very few there are are well-done, but the characters and the scenario is just boring. Lucy is a cardboard cutout - I'm not a huge fan of ScarJo, but here she is given nothing to play with. First, Lucy is terrified, then she loses all desire and passion and emotions, and acts like a Terminator for the rest of the movie. She gets a cop sidekick at one point, and I don't even remember the guy's name. His character is just there. And Morgan Freeman is nice, and play his role of Mr. Exposition well. But ultimately that is all he is.

So, in short, Lucy is a mess with boring characters and a pompous tone pretending to teach us about the meaning of life by talking for 1h30 about something that doesn't exist. Just like a visit to the Creation Museum.